Open House London Part 1: Westminster

The first queue of the day:
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Queuing is something of a theme when it comes to Open House London.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is the queen of Whitehall buildings. Built in the Italianate style with decadent interior decor designed to impress visiting European statesmen and colonial delegations.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
The only information available on the day concerned how much the FCO is working to reduce their energy and water use. I can sleep easier knowing that the toilets in the FCO building now use 20% less water per flush.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
This is the Durbar court, a term dating back to before the Raj where Mughal Emperors would hold court.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
The Locarno rooms are by far the grandest of ceremonial rooms at the FCO. Lots of gilt and chandeliers.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Leading up to the rooms is the Grand Staircase.
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
The strangest thing about the staircase is that on the ground floor it only leads into very ordinary, plain corridors. Not the sort of grand entrance that might be expected.
FCO Queue
More from the FCO here.

After the grandeur of the Foreign Office the Treasury was refreshingly minimalist.
HM Treasury
It’s even had quite a tasteful modern refurbishment in the last ten years.
HM Treasury
More from HM Treasury.

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
The newish Supreme Court of the United Kingdom has inherited the old Middlesex Guildhall. It’s been redeveloped very tastefully to keep the character of the old building while modernising the interior.
Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
The Library, lots of law books. All in a much better condition than the law books I remember from university.
Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
These flags represent the Crown Dependencies and former colonies that have, for whatever reason, a final route of judicial appeal to London. A little colonial throwback in a newly refurbished building.

More from the Supreme Court.

Part 2 to follow.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s